Natural Herbal Supplements for Diabetes

Most people have come to recognize the benefits of natural cures, including medical professionals. Herbal supplements have become more and more popular in recent years, as have the research behind their recommendation for specific conditions. With Type II Diabetes becoming an epidemic in North America, a lot of focus has been placed on the natural management of blood sugar levels. 90% of the more than three million diabetic Canadians have Type II Diabetes.

Not all associated herbs have been scientifically proven to lower and stabilize blood sugar, so it’s wise to proceed with caution. Herbs should only be used for the management of diabetes and blood sugar levels under the guidance of a medical professional. Some herbs may interact with medications, irritate other medical conditions, or be unsafe for pregnant/nursing Moms. Introduce herbal supplements one at a time so you can monitor your blood sugar and identify the cause of any side effects.

Note: For herbs to work for any condition, you must use fresh or expertly dried/stored plants (preferably organic). We rely on Starwest Botanicals for high quality herbs.

The herbs most commonly recommended by experts for lowering and stabilizing blood sugar are:

Ginseng
Cinnamon
Fenugreek seeds
Garlic
Gymnema Sylvestre
Bitter Melon
Prickly Pear Cactus
Billberry
Horse Chestnut
Burdock
Dandelion Root
Oregano
Sage

I’m a Type II Diabetic and personally use Cinnamon, Fenugreek, Garlic, Oregano, Burdock, Dandelion and Billberry for the management of my blood sugar levels. I also take medication so it’s impossible to honestly say how much benefit I receive from herbal supplements alone. However, I have definitely seen improvement in blood sugar stability. I no longer have the wild fluctuations in blood sugar levels I used to have.

I like the convenience and versatility of freshly dried, organic herbs, which I often add to food like soups and sauces. I use freshly dried cinnamon mixed with granulated Splenda on a piece of whole grain toast in the morning. I mix it up and store it in a spice jar. Sliced apples, also beneficial for diabetics, are fantastic when sprinkled with the Cinnamon and Splenda mix as well.

Have you found any herbs that help your diabetes? Please share them in the comments below.

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4 Responses to "Natural Herbal Supplements for Diabetes"

  1. Hannah  May 31, 2016

    I do pretty well at keeping my blood sugar down but I could use some help with stability so I’ll be trying some of your suggestions.

    Reply
  2. Roz  April 17, 2015

    diet and exercise are the key but herbs can help too!

    Reply
  3. Loraine Duncan  April 11, 2015

    I just found out I have type 2 diabetes and went straight to google LOL. Thanks for the tips, I like to do things natural if I can.

    Reply
    • Hari  May 5, 2015

      An A1C test, also known as a glycated hboiglmeon test, isn’t used for diagnosing prediabetes or diabetes. Instead, it gauges how well you’re managing your diabetes.Unlike a fasting blood glucose test or a daily finger stick, both of which measure your blood sugar level at a given time, the A1C test reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Test results show what percentage of your hboiglmeon — a protein found in red blood cells — is sugar coated (glycated).

      Reply

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